Category Archives: Sources, Archives, Libraries….

The “Love Letter” Archive

An archive in Germany collects love letters over the century until today – a citizen science approach

The archive is being digitised, indexed and made accessible in cooperation with the Technical University of Darmstadt. The archive records are stored at the Koblenz-Landau University Library (Koblenz Campus).

The archive shows Love letters how private writing changes over time. Love letter exists in wide circles of society; one gains an insight into the writing norms not only of individuals but also of milieus, age groups and genders. So it is not surprising that the love letter is differentiated along with the popular writing media from the little note to the love letter, from the telegram to the postcard, from the e-mail to the WhatsApp chat. The question is to what extent the functions of writing are being explored anew.

https://liebesbriefarchiv.wordpress.com/grus-kuss-briefe-digital-burgerinnen-erhalten-liebesbriefe/

Continue reading The “Love Letter” Archive

WAR LETTERS in HISTORICAL RESEARCH? THE Museum of American War Letters

The Museum of American war letters is a virtual exhibition launched by Andrew Carroll, the Center for American War Letters – together with Chapman University (Orange, California). The site intends to exhibit correspondences from the American Revolution up to the present. 

https://world.treasured.ca/player/MuseumOfAmericanWarLetters

https://world.treasured.ca/player/MuseumOfAmericanWarLetters

 

What are the aims of this platform? How can this collection be used for teaching projects in higher education or in research? Continue reading WAR LETTERS in HISTORICAL RESEARCH? THE Museum of American War Letters

LETTERS AS SOURCES? BETWEEN FRONTLINE AND PENCIL – PERSONAL EXPERIENCES OF LUXEMBOURGERS DURING WWII IN NAZI LABOUR AND ARMED SERVICES

The current project WARLUX aims to study the biographies of young Luxembourgers, born between 1920 and 1927, who were drafted by the German Nazi authorities for Labour Service (Reichsarbeitsdienst) and the German Army (Wehrmacht). The conscription of young Luxembourgers is mostly displayed in documents, starting from police, enrolment registration records by regional authorities, lists of transportations and records about their service. However, for the study of biographies, a more personal insight of the affected people is required, as behind these administrative files ley 10.000 other stories.

Soldiers writing letters (from: Horst Hinrichsen, Die deutsche Feldpost. Organisation und Ausrüstung 1939-1945, Wölfersheim-Berstadt 1998, p. 35.

Continue reading LETTERS AS SOURCES? BETWEEN FRONTLINE AND PENCIL – PERSONAL EXPERIENCES OF LUXEMBOURGERS DURING WWII IN NAZI LABOUR AND ARMED SERVICES

Biographies, Interviews and Letters of Soviet Red Army Soldiers and Veterans

The website iremember.ru – an open-access collection on oral history with more than 2,500 interviews with Soviet veterans of World War II. The project, which was started in 2000 as a small grassroots project, soon received state support and developed into an important element of Russia’s contemporary memory landscape.

One of the personal statements and interviews are from Klavdia Kalugina, a sniper in the Red Army



Continue reading Biographies, Interviews and Letters of Soviet Red Army Soldiers and Veterans

Memories of the front – Digital archive of Soviet Jewish soldiers in WWII

Blavatnik Archive collects memories and testimonies from Soviet Jewish soldiers who fought during WWII in the Red Army

https://www.blavatnikarchive.org/story/wwii-front

 

With over 30 million men, the Soviet Red Army was the largest and most ethnically diverse armed force ever assembled. 450,000 of these troops were Soviet-Jewish soldiers. The Blavatnik Archive is a nonprofit foundation dedicated to preserving and disseminating primary source materials that contribute to the study of 20th century Jewish and world history, with a special emphasis on World War I, World War II, and Soviet Russia. The Archive was founded in 2005 by American industrialist and philanthropist Len Blavatnik to reflect his commitment to cultural heritage, and expand his support for primary-source-based scholarship and education. Primarily through its metadata-rich, item-based website, the Archive shares its holdings as widely as possible for research, education, and public enrichment.

Continue reading Memories of the front – Digital archive of Soviet Jewish soldiers in WWII